COMPOSING YOUR PHOTOGRAPH

rule-of-thirds-dog
Expert Photography


COMPOSING YOUR PHOTOGRAPH



The composition of your photograph is what is actually in the frame (what you see as you look through the lens) of your camera.

Composition is about perspective.

Most people shoot their pictures as they are standing. This is not often your best shot.

HELPFUL HINTS:

  1. You might have a better perspective for your picture if you shoot the picture from a kneeling position, or even while lying on the ground.
  2. Many people put the subject of their photograph right in the middle of their frame. This also might not be your best choice.
  3. The rule of thirds will allow for a far more professional photograph.
  4. Being aware of the background of your subject- branches, telephone poles, electrical wires- allows you to negate a great deal of distraction from your picture.
  5. Don’t shot the subject you are photographing with their head on the horizon. This is never likely be a very good picture. Place their head below the horizon.
  6. Use more negative space. This means allow for black space- waters, mountains, etc.

But the most important thing you can do…

Practice … go take a few pictures.

Practice some more … there a places just minutes away that would allow for some excellent shots.

Practice even more … Take a small half-hour (one hour) trip. There are millions of places i your own backyard that will make beautiful photographs!

Here is a video that will explain in far more detail about the ways to compose a picture BEFORE you click than I can in a few words.



Written for Photography.

PHOTOGRAPHIC RESOLUTION AND QUALITY

pixels.0
Scientific Curiousity


PHOTOGRAPHIC RESOLUTION AND QUALITY



The resolution of an image depends mostly on the number of pixels in your photograph.

Photographs are made up of hundreds and hundreds of tiny dot.

This is usually represented by megapixels. 24 mp = 24,000,000 pixels.

But more pixels does not necessarily mean the photograph is of a higher quality. This also depends on the quality of the sensor in your camera.

The larger the sensor usually means the better the picture.

Of course, I have a video to help you along. MEGAPIXELS

(Don’t forget to see the one below!)


A video about sensors …



Written for Photography.

PHOTOGRAPHY: FILE TYPES

raw jpeg
knowtechie


PHOTOGRAPHY: FILE TYPES

JPEG  -vs-  RAW



There are two main types of files for photography: JPEG and RAW.

JPEG: This is a compressed format file. It takes up little storage room.

RAW: This is an uncompressed file. It takes up a huge amount of storage space.

JPEG files are easy to share. They are the type of pictures that you can post quickly to your blog or your Facebook or Instagram pages. These files can easily be set to a friend.

RAW files are HUGE! The are NOT as quickly shared, adn when they are shared that use a lot of memory storage space.

So why does a photographer ever use RAW files.

  • RAW files allow the photographer many more detailed pixels to work with in editing the photograph. There are innumerable ways a photographer can edit his treasure if the picture is filed in a RAW file.
  • With a JPEG, there are few adjustments the photographer can make once the picture has been taken.

There are some cameras that will allow you to take both a JPEG and a RAW photographic shot simultaneously- the photographer does have to chose.

Here is a video that will help clarify things.



Written for Photography.

 

WHITE BALANCE

white balance
diyvideoeditor


WHITE BALANCE



Color temperature (white balance) is measured with a scale just like all the other processes in photography.

The AWB (Auto White Balance) setting is used probably almost all the time by almost all photographers.

white-balance-presets
Shutter Muse



But there are handheld setting a photographer can use. These are usually represented by icons.




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Pinterest

Some cameras even have a special Kelvin Temperature meter you can set yourself.




A photographer wants the camera to see as much white and the color white and the other colors a they truly are.





Here is a video that should help with your understanding.



Written for Photography.

PHOTOGRAPHY: THE FLASH

unnamed
Favim


PHOTOGRAPHY

THE FLASH AND THE FILTER



The tools OUTSIDE of your camera are the FLASH and the FILTER.

Some common sense statements …

  • If your photograph seems too dark- Use a FLASH.
    • Of course, you will likely use the flash when your surroundings are losing light, but …
      • You might use FLASH to overpower the sun when you want to take a photograph of an object/ person with the sun in the background (behind your object).


If your photograph is too bright- Use a FILTER.

  • ND (Neutral Density) filters are usually used for long exposures- like is you want to capture the moving water of a stream or the cascading water from a waterfall.


I hope they help. (I think I am VERY CONFUSED with this information so far, but I have only viewed the videos once.)



Written for Photography and On-Line Tours.

 

PHOTOGRAPHY: THE EXPOSURE TRIANGLE

Triangle
PHLearn


PHOTOGRAPHY

THE EXPOSURE TRIANGLE



I found trying to understand THIS concept the most difficult. The videos seem to imply that it would be- They continued to say, “You have to continue to try this yourself as you take pictures to fully grasp how your camera works.” Or words to that same effect.

So …. I investigated a lot of videos for clarification.

The VOCABULARY for THE EXPOSURE TRIANGLE

THE METER

  • The meter is a tool on your camera that will automatically set THE EXPOSURE TRIANGLE for you. (So, why learn all this stuff to begin with?) Being able to personally control THE EXPOSURE TRIANGLE means that you can creatively have far more control of your outcome- the perfect picture that you desire.

APERTURE

  • The aperture controls your field-of-depth for your composition. (Do you want to object you are shooting to be clear and the background blurry, or do you want your entire picture as realistic as possible?)

ISO

  • You want the ISO setting to be as low as possible. Test your camera to see what is the camera’s best ISO. Try starting around 100 ISO.

SHUTTER SPEED

  • If you picture is too bright- speed up the shutter speed.
  • If your picture is too dark- slow down the shutter speed.
  • *Remember to go no slower than 1/60th because of the shaking of the hands when you take pictures.

This video did a good job at regurgitating the vocabulary in a show-and-tell way.

It helped me…

I think.



Self-adjusting the  EXPOSURE TRIANGLE means that instead of the camera automatically doing all of these things for you, you are controlling each tool by itself.

And then practice… practice… practice.

I hope the video  helped. (I am going to wait for warmer weather … then do my own personal investigating.)



Written for Photography and On-Line Tours.

LEARNING MORE ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY: ISO

what-is-ISO-4
PictureCorrect

LEARNING MORE ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY: ISO


IOS: this describes the sensitivity of your cameras sensors.

  • The higher the ISO number, the more sensitive your camera is going to be.
    • The higher the ISO, the brighter the picture.
  • The lower the ISO number, the less sensitive your camera is going to be.
    • The lower the ISO, the darker the picture.

In the daylight, an ISO of 100 or 200 might be appropriate.

At night, an ISO of 600 or 800 would be more appropriate.

The following video should assist in explaining things even further.



Written for Photography and On Line Tours and Learning.

THAT DASTARDLY “NOT RESPONDING”

unnamed



THAT DASTARDLY “NOT RESPONDING”



My Micros-Soft Auto-Save hates me.

It’s as clear as my nose, can’t you see.

It was entirely my fault. I agree.

I’d completed a poem that was great,

But the spinning error sealed my fate.

My poem missed the boat. I’m just out-a-luck. That’s me.


FYI: True story- TODAY! I had jut completed a two stanza quatrain wonderfully rhyming, and perfect meter… a poem about a man living a rat-race of a life, I hit save and … The poem tells the rest of the story.



Written for P.A.D. Poem-a-Day: Writer’s Digest … Day 13: For today’s prompt, write a purpose poem. Many people like to have a purpose in life. Some folks do things on purpose. And yes, sometimes it appears there is no purpose to life’s events. Whatever drives you, I hope you’re able to pair purpose (or lack of purpose) with your poetry today.

 

 

 

 

 

Written for P.A.D. Poem-a-Day: Writer’s Digest … Day 13: For today’s prompt, write a purpose poem. Many people like to have a purpose in life. Some folks do things on purpose. And yes, sometimes it appears there is no purpose to life’s events. Whatever drives you, I hope you’re able to pair purpose (or lack of purpose) with your poetry today.

LEARNING MORE ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY: SHUTTER SPEED

Shutter-Speed-Diagram_Owned
CreativeLive


LEARNING MORE ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY

SHUTTER SPEED


Shutter Speed: the time allowed for the light from the outside of the camera to be let in to the inside of the camera.

Shutter speed is represented by a number.

  • A short shutter speed means light is allowed in for just fractions of a second.
    • This will give you a darker photograph.
  • A longer shutter speed means that light can be let into your camera for 30-seconds. Or a minute. Or even longer.
    • This will give you a brighter photograph.

Adjusting the shutter speed allows the photographer greater creativity in the process of snapping a picture.

A photographer captures the motion from the outside of the camera and recreates it into a still photograph.

  • A fast shutter speed would give you the picture of a race car in-one-moment.
  • A slow shutter speed will give you a picture of the race car with a blurred tail.

When using your camera as a hand-held tool, use a shutter speed of 1/80 or even 1/100. It will assist you in keeping any movement of you, the photographer, from effecting your picture.

  • At 1/50 or 1/30, you will likely see a blurred picture.
  • For long exposure pictures, use a tripod. This will alleviate any motions.

This video should even explain things further:



Written for Photography and On Line Tours and Learning.

LEARNING MORE ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY: APERTURE SETTINGS

lens-aperture-stop-down-diaphragm-animation



LEARNING MORE ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY APERTURE SETTINGS



The process of photography is the process of capturing light.

The camera controls how much light is captured in three different ways:

  • Use of the aperture
  • Use of the ISO
  • Use of the shutter speed
  • Filters and Flashes  (can be added to your camera to increase or reduce the amount of light available at the time.)

If you are just beginning as a photographer, your camera likely has an automatic setting that will control your light conditions for you and allow your camera to take the best picture possible at that given moment.

But once you have become more experienced, you might want to begin controlling many of the photo optic conditions yourself.


THE APERTURE

The aperture affects the depth of the field that your photograph will have available.

A shallow depth … means that the subject focused on in the foreground will be clear, but the background will become blurred.

A deep depth … means that the subject focused on in the foreground- as well as the remainder of the content of your picture- will be photographed as clearly as possible with your camera.

  • For the blurred effect – use a larger aperture.
  • For a clear (I want to see everything) effect – use a smaller aperture.

THE F-STOP

Apertures work through a system of numbers called f-stops. The f-stop is a fractional equivalent to tell you how much light is being allowed into the iris of your camera’s lense.

  • f/1.4 – this is a very large hole for light, thus giving you a very bright picture.
  • f/22 – this is a very small hole for light, thus giving you a much darker picture.

I suspect the following video will help clarify things for you.



Written for Photography and On-Line Tours for Learning.